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Slowly Going Crazy Am I....

Updated: May 24, 2022

OVERWHELM. I’m sure you are familiar with this word and with this feeling.


I have been experiencing this a lot over the last couple months and I’m not used to it. It’s been something difficult to navigate and, to be honest, admit to. I guess I want to be the person who can handle it all. And right now I sit here admitting fully, I cannot. The hardest part of what I’ve been experiencing is not the overwhelm itself, but the fact that I don’t feel like I should be feeling overwhelmed when I don’t think there is actually that much being thrown my way. I’ve managed just fine with a lot more on my plate.


It's interesting to me how our bodies are designed to force us to stop when we’re doing too much. I’m sure you’ve heard the saying “if you don’t pick a day to rest, your body will choose one for you”. Our system has a built-in circuit interrupter – when it feels our system has taken on too much, it shuts down. Our legs give out when we’ve run too much, we get a cold or flu when our immune system has been in overdrive, we fall asleep at work/school/during a movie when we’ve been functioning on too little rest. These are just a few examples of how our physical body tells us it’s had enough. Our minds are no different. When we are experiencing a mental overwhelm, our mind shuts down. We aren’t able to focus, we feel panicked when we think ahead or try to organize all that we have taken on, we cry easily, we yell easily or find ourselves a little closer to our boiling point, we just can’t seem to find mental energy for new ideas. These are symptoms of overwhelm.


How do you free yourself of this feeling? How to you get a handle on things when feeling this? Well, I will share what is working for me and perhaps you can comment below on things that work for you! A collaboration to beat overwhelm. To reset our inner balance. Here’s my little list;


  1. I try to stay focused on one thing at a time. I attempt (sometimes poorly) to stay present. Focusing too much on things ahead that need attention can bring on a panic feeling.

  2. I am honest with those around me about my current state. I have shared with my kids that I’ve been feeling overwhelmed and have been very honest about how much I can handle (or how many of their requests I can handle). I have asked them to wait until one thing is finished before discussing another (these are the less important things, like finding time to shop for grad shoes when we have a month before grad)

  3. Embrace the emotions. Cry when you need to cry. Yell when you need to yell (not at people, if you can help it… into your pillow, in a room by yourself… think “scream therapy”). Let the emotions out so they don’t get stuck inside wreaking havoc. They will come out eventually, better to let them out in a more controlled environment.

  4. Ask for help. I am not very good at this one. At all. But, if you have a co-parent that can take on an equal share of the child responsibilities, or perhaps a little more when necessary, then ask. Or a friend, parent, even an older child that can pitch in. A little extra help is better than none.

  5. Meditate or quiet time. Giving yourself even as little as 5 minutes to close your eyes and breathe. To relax and refocus – or try not to focus as all. Empty the mind. Allow the fog to dissipate.

  6. Move your body. Exercise of any kind moves your energy. I’ve talked about this before on other platforms – it is the one sure way to break up your current energy loop. And it is an excellent way to clear your mind and relieve a little inner stress. So walk, run, swim, bike, lift, swing, dance, flip… move that vessel of yours!

  7. Nature. Another favourite of mine for healing and recalibrating. Getting outside in some capacity. Preferably on a trail somewhere, but I've found even in the backyard or garden also work. Breathing in the scents of the earth. Taking in the natural energy.

  8. Spend time with people who are good for your soul and mental energy. People who fill you up instead of draining you. Time might not be something you have a lot of in the state of overwhelm, but setting aside time to spend with people who will recharge you, is well worth it. And if you can’t spend physical time with them, call or text.

  9. Make a list! Can you tell this is one of my regular activities? I love lists! It’s a great way to organize and to remember. I also find once I write it down, I don’t worry about it as much. And crossing things off the list is extremely satisfying when a task is complete. If the overwhelm you’re experiencing doesn’t fit with list making, try journaling. Not a method I use often, but when I do, I find it helpful. When you free journal (allow what comes up around the topic to come out on paper – actual pen to paper – often gives light to the piece that is particularly triggering and can often lead to a solution).

  10. Be grateful and positive as much as possible. Yes, toxic positivity is a thing – and nobody can be positive all the time. However, being grateful for the little things will put your mind and body in a more functionable state. Focusing on the stress and negativity will only result in more stress and negativity.


I’m starting to see the light at the end of my own period of overwhelm… hopefully you will too! It doesn’t last forever. And you will get through this. I’d love to hear what helps you through!



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